As an early birthday celebration a good friend took me to a new place, FABO in Myers Park on Selwyn … I’ll go again … Want to join me?

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FABO, a locally owned coffee shop and art gallery, offers work from over 50 local artists in many mediums including jewelry, pottery and paintings. Our coffee shop features artisan coffee with fresh roasted beans and delectable goodies created by local food artists Tizzerts and Edible Arts.

Something is always changing at FABO – so come by often!

via FABO Cafe.

 

I was out of the country on vacation and did not find out about the crash until I was returning and saw the headlines in the airport. I was devastated … and when I returned home to Charlotte our own newspaper’s cartoonist Doug Marlette had drawn this cartoon. It says it all …

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via Google Image Result for http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/marlette2.jpg.

When I went to the Kennedy Space Center on January 28, 1986, to cover the launch of the space shuttle Challenger, I was expecting it to be routine, like the launches I had covered in the past. The only thing different this time was the excitement that surrounded the first teacher-turned-astronaut, Christa McAuliffe.

It was brutally cold, and the weather caused the launch to slip several times during the morning. Just before launch, I walked down to the countdown clock, as was tradition among the journalists, and waited for liftoff. I remember that typical winter clear-blue sky as Challenger took off.

That was the beginning of monthslong coverage of what was at the time the worst disaster in NASA history. I will never forget that image. When I close my eyes, I can see what I once thought looked like fireworks: the Challenger and its crew gone in 73 seconds. The nightmares I had of space shuttles exploding finally ended, but it took several years.

via Zarrella on 25 years ago: ‘We realized that something was really wrong’ – This Just In – CNN.com Blogs.

 

I’m mad. I do not like change. I find the airport Queen Charlotte amusing and welcoming … she’s certainly not pretty!

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Queen Charlotte must find a new home after more than 20 years greeting travelers from a cast stone column at the front of Charlotte Douglas International Airport’s terminal.

Airport Director Jerry Orr says expansion plans for the airport have forced the move of the 16-foot-tall bronze statue from her 25-foot-high perch.

Queens Table — an anonymous group of donors — commissioned the work in the late 1980s from sculptor Raymond Kaskey. That’s the same artist who cast the statues marking the four corners of The Square in uptown (also a donation from the Queens Table).

via Queen Charlotte statue departing from airport terminal | Charlotte Business Journal.

Good article on Billy Graham … he regrets close connections to politics.

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“[S]uccess is always dangerous, and we need to be alert and avoid becoming the victims of our own success. Will we influence the world for Christ, or will the world influence us?”

via Billy Graham’s Regret: ‘I Would Have Steered Clear of Politics’.

Great lunch with my great friend. I will say this … I prefer the old Penguin to Pinky’s, and I highly recommend Amelie’s for coffee and dessert. However I have heard that the view of Charlotte on a nice evening is wonderful from Pinky’s … not much on a cold, rainy, wintry day.

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Pinky’s Westside Grill – Charlotte Restaurant.

Charlotte NC :: Amelie’s French Bakery :: Amelie’s French Bakery and Cafe.

So we ventured to Jake’s Good Eats for a second visit. It is an upscale diner … in an old gas station. The food is interesting. The friend oysters were very good, but the sautéed spinach underneath was to die for. The wedge with bleu cheese and bacon was very good … a meal in itself. And my vegetable plate was quite good. I could not have downed a full entre after the other two shared items. I’ll go again … but get there early. It is worth a 30 minute wait … but not an hour.

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Jake’s Good Eats -.

Interesting history of courses at Davidson.

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In the spring of 1911, the college issued a new college catalog – one that contained a small but significant shift. The course listings for 1909-1901o catalog included a heading for Mental and Moral Philosophy.  The new catalog listed Philosophy and Psychology.

The name change signals a shift in ideas about classical education and the acceptance of new academic fields. Davidson College had offered a course in Mental Philosophy since its beginnings, usually offered only to seniors and as part of a collection of “philosophies”–moral, natural, mechanical, and mental -using readings from classical authors to explain the wonders of the natural world and humankind.  Three years earlier, the February 1908 catalog carried the first listing for a class in Biology.  Seven years earlier than that (taking us back to 1901), the college had its first president with a Ph.D.

via From Mental Philosophy to Psychology — Around the D.

 

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