It struck me as funny that Jeff Elder made a list of Charlotte’s best coffee shops for his social media blog … old meets new in the social networking world … BTW, I like Amelie’s!

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I’m an independent social media consultant again — after a year in corporate America leading social media for a Fortune 50 company. That means Charlotte’s coffee shops are some of my places of business once more. (Along with my home office in Dilworth and the places where I consult.) So I’ve been running through my list of favorite Charlotte coffee shops. (I wish I could call them cafes, but not all really are. What is this, Paris?) These are my Top 10. I fully anticipate a heated debate. Free refills on the arguments.

via Jeff Elder on social media: 10 Best Coffee Shops in Charlotte.

 

What a great addition to the Charlotte restaurant scene.

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As you enter The King’s Kitchen, on a busy corner in uptown Charlotte, you might overlook one sign that this is no ordinary restaurant. High on a wall of the foyer is a Bible verse, Proverbs 19:17, written in neat, black script: “He who has pity on the poor lends to the Lord, and He will pay back what he has given.”

The bankers and office workers who crowd the restaurant at lunch and dinner are here for Aunt Beaut’s panfried chicken and classic Southern-style vegetables cooked with a modern, healthier twist — without the fatback. They come back for the cornbread plump with kernels, the banana pudding layered with homemade vanilla wafers, the shrimp and grits.

via The King’s Kitchen | Our State Magazine.

 

Another great meal with the Trobs and Rufus and Sarah! … and the bacon braised spinach was to die for … no joke.

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Jake’s Good Eats –.

Great lunch yesterday At King’s Kitchen with the Trobs!

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“EAT SOME CHICKEN AND FEED SOMEBODY”

*Biscuits and Cornbread are served with an order of a Meat & Three, or are available upon request

John had — The King Burger … huge, very good with TONS of fries.

Joni, Bob and I had the traditional MEAT & THREE.

Bob and I choosing Aunt Beaut’s Pan-Fried All Natural Chicken with Tomato Soup, Iceberg Salad & Spinach (me) and with Tomato Soup, Iceberg Salad & Pan Seared Cabbage (Bob).

Joni had Bennon’s Pot Roast with Rosa’s Fried Green Beans, Sea Island Red Peas & ?

All very GOOD and definitely worth a return visit!

Where you FEAST TO FEED SOMEBODY.

We’re a not for profit restaurant serving up southern cuisine made with fresh, local ingredients from right here in our community. And the proceeds go back to the community, helping to feed those in need. So, come on in. Because when you dine, the whole community thrives.

The King’s Kitchen.

The King’s Kitchen is a not for profit restaurant that fuels economic vitality, growth in Charlotte’s Center City and the greater metropolitan area creating jobs and supporting community development. First, the restaurant will employ a segment of our community that is considered unemployable, from people who have come out of prison and rehab, to youths that are at high risk from dropping out of school. Once employed, they will receive training to run a full service restaurant from the front of the house to the back. They will also receive leadership and spiritual training as well in order to gain the life skills that are necessary to be successful in today’s job market. Secondly, the profits from The King’s Kitchen will provide funds and/or foods for established feeding centers in the community to provide meals for those in need. Designed to operate profitably, all profits will be used to help feed the hungry here in Charlotte, surrounding areas and in other parts of the world.

via The King’s Kitchen Restaurant – Charlotte, NC | OpenTable.

Great evening in Davidson with Doug and Julie (and Elise) and great performance by all the students … kudos to Cinderella’s Step Mother, Doug and Julie’s daughter Anne.

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“Into the Woods,” which was first performed in 1986, intertwines the plots of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales and follows them further to explore the consequences of the characters’ wishes and quests. Sutch said, “Act I is straightforward musical comedy. It skewers Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Cinderella. But the second act is much more challenging, more serious, darker.”

Act II goes beyond the familiar endings of the fairy tales to explore the effects of wish fulfillment. Professor Sutch explained, “At the end of Act I everyone has gotten what they want, and everyone’s content. Act II demonstrates that we may think we’ll be happy once we get what we want, but things don’t work that way. We usually end up wishing for and striving for something more.”

The play also explores the conflict between parents and their maturing children, as parents struggle to let go and children try to take on the new responsibilities of independence. Characters who have relied on magic to achieve their desires, and the play’s narrator to make their decisions, must learn how to solve problems without help from higher powers.

The Davidson production will emphasize the role of the narrator (played by Will James ’11) to show the characters’ problematic reliance on external powers to resolve conflict. James acts as a kind of ringmaster of the production, with full control over lighting, sets, music and the fates of the characters. When the narrator ceases to narrate in Act II, the characters must take ownership of their actions.

Sondheim’s poignant musical score compliments the play’s themes and includes the Broadway standard “Children Will Listen” among other well-known songs. Sutch said, “You can pour emotion into a song in a way that you can’t with spoken text. Songs provide a shortcut to our emotions.”

Musical Director Jacquelyn Culpepper said, “The music is incredibly complex, with layers and layers to be unraveled. Rhythms are intricate and the text is full of alliterations that would twist any tongue. It requires the skill and balance from singer-actors, and we’re lucky to have talented, dedicated students who can pull it off.”

Sutch also commended the exceptional talent of his cast of 19 students. He said, “I’ve really been impressed by their work ethic and the quality of what they’ve produced so far. It really is the strongest ensemble I’ve worked with at this school this far.”

via Video: ‘Into the Woods’ at Davidson College | DavidsonNews.net Guide.

An all-star lineup of our favorite fairy tale characters hilariously collide as they pursue their deepest wishes and chase their own “happy ever after.” But what happens after the story ends, when all of their wishes come true? Familiar stories are upended and people must trust in more than magic in this delightful, tender modern musical classic. Recommended for ages 8 and up. Contains some mature themes.

“Mr. Sondheim’s score…shows every sign of enduring into happily-ever-after posterity…It will take you somewhere wonderful.” — New York Times

via Into the Woods.

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