Qu’ils mangent de la brioche … Well if you have to eat cake … try  cannoli cake from Suarez Bakery – Home (thank you Trobs) or cupcakes from The Blushing Bakeshop – Home (thank you Dan) .. both were excellent on my day.

And now for a history lesson  from Wikipedia …

This article is about the phrase commonly misattributed to Marie Antoinette. For other uses, see Let them eat cake (disambiguation).

“Let them eat cake” is the traditional translation of the French phrase “Qu’ils mangent de la brioche”, supposedly spoken by “a great princess” upon learning that the peasants had no bread. As brioche is a luxury bread enriched with eggs and butter, it would reflect the princess’s obliviousness to the nature of a famine.

Although they are commonly attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette,[1] there is no record of these words ever having been uttered by her. They appear in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions, his putative autobiographical work (completed in 1769, when Marie Antoinette was 13), where he wrote the following in Book 6:

Enfin je me rappelai le pis-aller d’une grande princesse à qui l’on disait que les paysans n’avaient pas de pain, et qui répondit : Qu’ils mangent de la brioche.

Finally I recalled the last retort of a great princess who was told that the peasants had no bread, and who responded: “Let them eat brioche.”

Rousseau does not name the “great princess” and there is speculation that he invented the anecdote, which has no other sources.[2]

via Let them eat cake – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.