5.17.2011 … Kudos and happy 125th The Charlotte Observer!

Leave a comment

Happy 125th birthday to The Charlotte Observer, a newspaper that first began telling Charlotte’s story when it was yet a dream.

Along the way, the Observer has put forward some dreams of its own, helping to shape our region in significant ways. Some will say for the better, others for the worse, depending on a particular issue or outcome. But there is no denying that the place where we live today is a blended legacy of an aspiring city and its newspaper.

That legacy continues now as Charlotte shakes off a devastating collapse of the banking industry and the Observer rewires itself for the digital age. Neither job will be easy, which makes it an especially good time to remember how far both have come.

via A part of your world, every day for 125 years | CharlotteObserver.com & The Charlotte Observer Newspaper.

Advertisements

Morehaead-Cain Scholarship: Kudos to all the winners and special kudos to our local winner Emily Auerbach.

Leave a comment

Six high school seniors from the Charlotte region will join 46 others from around the world to study at UNC-Chapel Hill over the next four years on the prestigious Morehead-Cain scholarship.

The Morehead-Cain, founded in 1945, is among the nation’s most competitive merit scholarship programs, paying all expenses for four years of undergraduate study at Chapel Hill. Scholars also receive a laptop, and are provided four summer enrichment opportunities.

The value: $90,000 for in-state students; $170,000 for out-of-staters.

Thirty-four of the 52 scholars are from North Carolina. Six are international students: three from Great Britain, three from Canada.

Emily June Auerbach, Myers Park High in Charlotte. She is the daughter of Carol and Craig Auerbach of Charlotte.

Great evening in Davidson with Doug and Julie (and Elise) and great performance by all the students … kudos to Cinderella’s Step Mother, Doug and Julie’s daughter Anne.

Leave a comment

“Into the Woods,” which was first performed in 1986, intertwines the plots of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales and follows them further to explore the consequences of the characters’ wishes and quests. Sutch said, “Act I is straightforward musical comedy. It skewers Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Cinderella. But the second act is much more challenging, more serious, darker.”

Act II goes beyond the familiar endings of the fairy tales to explore the effects of wish fulfillment. Professor Sutch explained, “At the end of Act I everyone has gotten what they want, and everyone’s content. Act II demonstrates that we may think we’ll be happy once we get what we want, but things don’t work that way. We usually end up wishing for and striving for something more.”

The play also explores the conflict between parents and their maturing children, as parents struggle to let go and children try to take on the new responsibilities of independence. Characters who have relied on magic to achieve their desires, and the play’s narrator to make their decisions, must learn how to solve problems without help from higher powers.

The Davidson production will emphasize the role of the narrator (played by Will James ’11) to show the characters’ problematic reliance on external powers to resolve conflict. James acts as a kind of ringmaster of the production, with full control over lighting, sets, music and the fates of the characters. When the narrator ceases to narrate in Act II, the characters must take ownership of their actions.

Sondheim’s poignant musical score compliments the play’s themes and includes the Broadway standard “Children Will Listen” among other well-known songs. Sutch said, “You can pour emotion into a song in a way that you can’t with spoken text. Songs provide a shortcut to our emotions.”

Musical Director Jacquelyn Culpepper said, “The music is incredibly complex, with layers and layers to be unraveled. Rhythms are intricate and the text is full of alliterations that would twist any tongue. It requires the skill and balance from singer-actors, and we’re lucky to have talented, dedicated students who can pull it off.”

Sutch also commended the exceptional talent of his cast of 19 students. He said, “I’ve really been impressed by their work ethic and the quality of what they’ve produced so far. It really is the strongest ensemble I’ve worked with at this school this far.”

via Video: ‘Into the Woods’ at Davidson College | DavidsonNews.net Guide.

An all-star lineup of our favorite fairy tale characters hilariously collide as they pursue their deepest wishes and chase their own “happy ever after.” But what happens after the story ends, when all of their wishes come true? Familiar stories are upended and people must trust in more than magic in this delightful, tender modern musical classic. Recommended for ages 8 and up. Contains some mature themes.

“Mr. Sondheim’s score…shows every sign of enduring into happily-ever-after posterity…It will take you somewhere wonderful.” — New York Times

via Into the Woods.

Kudos to Sara, Anne and the other Watson Fellows! … and kudos to Sara’s proud parents … Lisa and Thomas!

Leave a comment

Sara Bates, Davidson College

Delivering Hope: A Comparative Study of Midwifery Programs and Practices

New Zealand, Indonesia, Chile, Ethiopia

While childbirth is often a positive and fulfilling experience, for too many women it is associated with fear, suffering, ill-health, and even death. Today, midwives remain the primary providers of health care for childbearing women around the world. Midwifery encompasses the care of women during pregnancy, labor, and the postpartum period, as well as care of the newborn. My project aims to explore the cross-cultural factors of midwifery in order to further my knowledge of the techniques midwives use and struggles they face on a daily basis.

Anne Temmink, Davidson College

Women, Sewing, and the Globalization of Fashion

Ghana, India, Indonesia

Clothing communicates many things about the history of a culture as well as an individual’s origins and affiliations. Historically, women throughout the world have occupied roles in many facets of clothing making. My proposal will take me to study in three countries each with an identity strongly tied to its particular style of dress or textile traditions. By working alongside seamstresses and dyers, I will explore the histories and trades that surround clothing production to see the effects of Western clothing on the livelihood of female artisans.

via The Watson Fellowship: Our Fellows.

First imposition of ashes for this lifelong Presbyterian … Remember from dust you came and to dust you shall return…

Leave a comment

Ashes on my forehead … and oh,so, apropos reading at the Ash Wednesday Service at  Selwyn Presbyterian with Sermon by Mary Henderson Bowman.  Kudos, Mary!

Psalm 51:8 Make me to hear joy and gladness; that the bones which thou hast broken may rejoice.

Ash Wednesday is a day of solemn assembly that is built right into the church year. It is a fast day, a day of mourning for our sin and the sin of all humanity before God, a recognition of our mortality save for the grace of God and a request that the Lord remember our creation and breathe new life into our burned-out, dusty lives once more.

via Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) – Resources – Ash Wednesday service.


Kudos, again, to Herb Jackson both for his new exhibit but even more for his gift to Davidson College and its students … 42 years of teaching.

Leave a comment

Jackson, whose work can be found at museums around the world and has had over 150 solo-exhibitions, is finally returning to NYC. Opening on February 17th at the Claire Oliver Gallery, Firestorm in the Teahouse will not only mark Jackson’s long-awaited return but also provide his admirers with the chance to see his newest, incredible paintings.

I chatted with the artist about his return to NYC, what it was like to be part of Donald Kuspit’s iconic exhibition of contemporary American art in the Soviet Union and his attempts at teaching me how to paint. Yep, that’s right, yours truly once had the honor of being taught by one of America’s most talented living artists. Too bad I really was a hopeless case…

Liv: Let’s start at the beginning, our at least of how I met you. What made you decide to become a studio art professor?

Herb Jackson: I always felt drawn to teaching, perhaps because I remember and still experience the wonder that comes from making art. To see the germination of a visual idea and then watch its growth, development and change in the hands and mind of a young person is a special privilege that I have enjoyed, and I hope honored, for 42 years.

via Interview with Herb Jackson.

Kudos to Herb Jackson!

Leave a comment

Riding the Phoenix by Herb Jackson

Riding the Phoenix by Herb Jackson

In case you have your snow boots ready and are traveling to NYC, be sure to plan your trip for mid-February to catch Herb Jackson’s art exhibit at the Claire Oliver Gallery on 513 West 26th Street (just off 10th Avenue).  The opening will be Thursday, Feb. 17, from 6-8 p.m. at the gallery.  For a digital preview of Herb’s paintings, access http://www.claireoliver.com and select the heading “upcoming” before clicking on his exhibition.  Congratulations, Herb, on your continued artistic success.

via Rabbi and fiancee’s love story makes a Times Sq. billboard | DavidsonNews.net.

 

Older Entries