I enjoyed my Labyrinth Walk #2 at Presbyterian Hospital while waiting for ET to wake from his liver biopsy on 5.26. Anyone know the source of the quote, “yet also: Be still for healing most likely whispers”?

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“I knew something good could come out of such pain. The new labyrinth will provide a point of focus to help people collect their thoughts during the grieving process,” said Linda Matney, donor and founder of the Jack and Linda Matney Family Foundation.

Dating back to the 14th century, a labyrinth is a geometric, flat surface with winding, circuitous paths. A labyrinth combines the imagery of the circle and the spiral into a meandering but purposeful course. Walking a labyrinth has been effective in reducing anxiety, lowering blood pressure and breathing rates, in addition to reducing chronic pain. Often people find peace, solace, release and a deep sense of joy as they reach the center of the labyrinth’s circuitous paths.

Designer, Tom Schultz, nationally recognized for his unique labyrinth designs, has patterned the Jack Matney Memorial Labyrinth after the 14th Century labyrinth at Chatres Cathedral in France.

The Jack Matney Memorial Labyrinth is supported by ongoing financial gifts from the community. In addition to the Labyrinth endowment, fundraising efforts continue for phase II of the labyrinth, projected to include a memorial prayer wall.

“My impetus in creating the labyrinth was to give patient’s families and caregivers the opportunity to focus on a spiritual connection, prayer or whatever could bring peace to each person.”

via New Presbyterian Hospital Labyrinth Puts Caregivers on Path to Peace.

Good article about a difficult issue – “I think everybody is trying to be faithful,” says Kate. “I think the trick is to be loving.”

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Each also made their case eloquently. Kate challenged the nine Bible passages commonly used in the condemnation of homosexuality. Some passages, she said, were about lust, not sexual orientation, and none applied to people in committed, monogamous relationships. Robert urged that Christians not turn their backs on homosexuals, but he said that Kate’s challenges ultimately didn’t answer all of the questions the Bible presented about sin and sexual boundaries.

All of which wasn’t very different than the arguments others have made for and against homosexuality. But what they wanted to get across, said Robert, was this: “We really want you to listen to the other person, because we respect that person.”

And when they were done, they sat together again as others spoke for and against Amendment 10-A, which eventually passed, 162-154. It was a passionate and polite debate – perhaps because Kate and Robert had set a tone, but also because of something else they want their community to know: that good, smart, faithful people on both sides are struggling and sorting through this debate.

One conversation. A different conversation. It’s not that hard to have, if you’re humble enough to understand you might not be right. Which, by the way, Kate and Robert each know. And so they talk. And they listen.

“I think everybody is trying to be faithful,” says Kate. “I think the trick is to be loving.”

via Peter St. Onge: On homosexuality, a discussion that’s different than others.

5.16.2011 … “Go forth, do well, do good.” … Sounds like something Yoda might say … :)

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Former Davidson College President Tom Ross returned to campus Sunday to help send off the Class of 2011, telling 436 graduates their Davidson degrees will create opportunities, but also bring a responsibility to lead.“Your Davidson diploma places you in a very privileged position compared most people in this world,” President Emeritus Ross told the crowd of students and parents.“But the position of privilege you occupy and the many opportunities that will come your way bring with them a responsibility to live lives of leadership and service.”Opportunity and responsibility “go hand in hand. Go forth, do well, do good,” he said during morning commencement ceremonies under the trees in front of Chambers Hall.

via Ross tells Davidson grads ‘do well and do good’ | DavidsonNews.net.

I enjoyed this article on the development of MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech via sound bites over time and the relationship to Charlotte.

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“If you look at every aspect of the ‘I Have a Dream’ speech, it’s a speech he compiles extemporaneously that he’s been trying out on audiences almost since he became a leader,” Carson said. “The essential message is prophetic … always pointing out the contradiction between what we were supposed to be doing and what we were really doing.

“King said America had great ideals and it wasn’t living up to them – especially in terms of race relations.”

via King’s speech has its roots in Charlotte – CharlotteObserver.com.

Qu’ils mangent de la brioche … Well if you have to eat cake … try cannoli cake from Suarez Bakery – Home (thank you Trobs) or cupcakes from The Blushing Bakeshop – Home (thank you Dan) .. both were excellent on my day.

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Qu’ils mangent de la brioche … Well if you have to eat cake … try  cannoli cake from Suarez Bakery – Home (thank you Trobs) or cupcakes from The Blushing Bakeshop – Home (thank you Dan) .. both were excellent on my day.

And now for a history lesson  from Wikipedia …

This article is about the phrase commonly misattributed to Marie Antoinette. For other uses, see Let them eat cake (disambiguation).

“Let them eat cake” is the traditional translation of the French phrase “Qu’ils mangent de la brioche”, supposedly spoken by “a great princess” upon learning that the peasants had no bread. As brioche is a luxury bread enriched with eggs and butter, it would reflect the princess’s obliviousness to the nature of a famine.

Although they are commonly attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette,[1] there is no record of these words ever having been uttered by her. They appear in Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Confessions, his putative autobiographical work (completed in 1769, when Marie Antoinette was 13), where he wrote the following in Book 6:

Enfin je me rappelai le pis-aller d’une grande princesse à qui l’on disait que les paysans n’avaient pas de pain, et qui répondit : Qu’ils mangent de la brioche.

Finally I recalled the last retort of a great princess who was told that the peasants had no bread, and who responded: “Let them eat brioche.”

Rousseau does not name the “great princess” and there is speculation that he invented the anecdote, which has no other sources.[2]

via Let them eat cake – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.