Great evening in Davidson with Doug and Julie (and Elise) and great performance by all the students … kudos to Cinderella’s Step Mother, Doug and Julie’s daughter Anne.

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“Into the Woods,” which was first performed in 1986, intertwines the plots of several Brothers Grimm fairy tales and follows them further to explore the consequences of the characters’ wishes and quests. Sutch said, “Act I is straightforward musical comedy. It skewers Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Cinderella. But the second act is much more challenging, more serious, darker.”

Act II goes beyond the familiar endings of the fairy tales to explore the effects of wish fulfillment. Professor Sutch explained, “At the end of Act I everyone has gotten what they want, and everyone’s content. Act II demonstrates that we may think we’ll be happy once we get what we want, but things don’t work that way. We usually end up wishing for and striving for something more.”

The play also explores the conflict between parents and their maturing children, as parents struggle to let go and children try to take on the new responsibilities of independence. Characters who have relied on magic to achieve their desires, and the play’s narrator to make their decisions, must learn how to solve problems without help from higher powers.

The Davidson production will emphasize the role of the narrator (played by Will James ’11) to show the characters’ problematic reliance on external powers to resolve conflict. James acts as a kind of ringmaster of the production, with full control over lighting, sets, music and the fates of the characters. When the narrator ceases to narrate in Act II, the characters must take ownership of their actions.

Sondheim’s poignant musical score compliments the play’s themes and includes the Broadway standard “Children Will Listen” among other well-known songs. Sutch said, “You can pour emotion into a song in a way that you can’t with spoken text. Songs provide a shortcut to our emotions.”

Musical Director Jacquelyn Culpepper said, “The music is incredibly complex, with layers and layers to be unraveled. Rhythms are intricate and the text is full of alliterations that would twist any tongue. It requires the skill and balance from singer-actors, and we’re lucky to have talented, dedicated students who can pull it off.”

Sutch also commended the exceptional talent of his cast of 19 students. He said, “I’ve really been impressed by their work ethic and the quality of what they’ve produced so far. It really is the strongest ensemble I’ve worked with at this school this far.”

via Video: ‘Into the Woods’ at Davidson College | DavidsonNews.net Guide.

An all-star lineup of our favorite fairy tale characters hilariously collide as they pursue their deepest wishes and chase their own “happy ever after.” But what happens after the story ends, when all of their wishes come true? Familiar stories are upended and people must trust in more than magic in this delightful, tender modern musical classic. Recommended for ages 8 and up. Contains some mature themes.

“Mr. Sondheim’s score…shows every sign of enduring into happily-ever-after posterity…It will take you somewhere wonderful.” — New York Times

via Into the Woods.

10.29.2010 … The String Bean in Belmont and P&P at Davidson …

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restaurants: actually Belmont … The String Bean is about 30 minutes from my house … worth the drive … I had a pimento cheese sandwich with fries fried in duck fat. Both were very good. Trobs had the Cuban and the Reuben (I think) … We will go again!

The String Bean Fresh Market and Deli is an experience. There’s nothing like it in the area. We feature a creative menu with daily specials that go far beyond your typical “Deli”. Our collection of 200 beers and 400 wines is sure to quench your thirst. The Market Place boasts never frozen fish and meats…cut to your liking

via Belmont North Carolina Restaurant : The String Bean Market & Deli.

food, I’d walk a mile for a …, facebook: My review of The String Bean … see above … brought on a fb discussion of french fries … what are your favorites … good enough that you would go out of your way to get them again?

C: We went to Dandelion Market (Charlotte) partially because they had duck fat fries on the menu, but they had taken them off. Bummer. About a half block from Caroline’s apartment in New York is the David Burke restaurant in Bloomingdale’s. …

D: If you are in Boulder’s Larkburger has trufle oil and parmesan fries which are amazing …

Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice, theater, Davidson, review, kudos:  I attended Davidson’s production of  P&P last night.  It was fun, but not great. The staging was very good … 50 scene changes … and they flowed. The acting was good, but loud (were they not used to the mics in the larger theater? … I know the story by heart and the dialogue, too … Some men in the audience laughed at the wrong points  … they obviously were not used to the subtlety of her dialogue … sorry, men. Kudos to Tatum P. who was a charming Mrs. Reynolds.

The Davidson College Theatre Department will present one of its most ambitious efforts ever in producing the North Carolina premier of one of literature’s most popular love stories October 27-31.

The college’s presentation of Jane Austen’s beloved 1813 novel, Pride and Prejudice, will be the state premier of a 2009 adaptation of the play by Joseph Hanreddy and J.R. Sullivan originally produced at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.

Professor of Theatre Ann Marie Costa, who directs the production, has assembled an “A Team” of area theatre professionals and a large student cast to reinforce the script with an energetic, rich production that highlights the humor and complexity of Austen’s characters. She said the new adaptation will especially appeal to Jane Austen fans because it maintains much of the actual dialogue of the novel.

DiFiore said the Davidson production should be highly entertaining for the audience as a “solid, full production.” It will include large ball scenes, dynamic lighting, elaborate costumes, music, and many scene changes.

Music provides almost constant accompaniment for the play, with theme music for lead characters and multiple instruments playing in large ballroom scenes. Davidson College music faculty member Cynthia Lawing played the piano parts on a modern instrument, and Bill Lawing, another music faculty member, converted it electronically to mimic the sound of a piano forte, the instrument played in Austen’s time. Sam Van Hallgren, a producer with WDAV, created the overall sound design for the play.

Charlotte-based costume designers Bob Croghan and Heidi O’Hare are creating period costumes from scratch for female characters, and Davidson College set designer Josh Peklo has built two major automated platforms that will support outdoor and indoor worlds for 50 scene changes. Delia Neil of UNC Charlotte is choreographing English country dance scenes, and Todd Wren has designed the lighting.

via Davidson College Mainstage Theatre Production of “Pride & Prejudice” | Charlotte Area News Local Section.